CMA legal squad fires another volley in Chicago tv license petition battle

Posted by Scott - March 14, 2010 (entry 642)

Citing the FCC's "curious neutrality-in-favor-of-the-licensee....", an application for review of the FCC's decision to deny the petions by Chicago Media Action and Milwaukee Public Interest Coalition was just filed by the public interest lawyers at the venerable Media Access Project. The 2005 petition to deny renewal of the licenses of 8 Chicago and 11 Milwaukee tv stations has begun to resemble a tin can tied to a dog's tail or a sailor's albatross -- it just does not seem to go away. It centers on the stations' near total absence of news coverage of local and state level elections.

Could this paucity of coverage possibly have something to do with Illinois' recent embarrassing lt. governor problem?

What was it Thomas Jefferson and James Madison said about an informed democracy? Gee, we can't remember now. That was so long ago. Did it have something to do with reality tv?

Here's a link to the latest filing. See CMA blog post 639 below for more background.

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